Category: Blog

Art vs Motel Art

Written by ASAF RONEN
Just knowing the information of the scene is not enough anymore. I understand the comfort of knowing the who, what and where, but the thing you need to learn to “yes and” more than anything is what your connection to that information is. There is a reason why some art hangs in motels and some hangs in museums and it’s not strictly the content.

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Treat Opinions Like Bears

Written by WYATT TALL
Agreeing to a subjective reality is NOT obvious. We can easily imagine two people in a room arguing about who should be president. Improviser 2 may think: I am YES ANDING being a person in a room talking politics. So where’s the problem?? The problem is it’s not very easy to make two people fighting over an opinion into a fun compelling scene. It’s often boring because it feels like what we see all the time in our daily lives.

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Play and Watch and Learn to Play

Written by CLIFTON HIGHFIELD
Improvisers need to perform in shows. The rehearsal process is great, and can be very rewarding, but the real reward is that instant that you forget everything that you have learned and play.

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How to Play to the Top of Your Intelligence

Written by KENNY MADISON
Have you ever heard that phrase before? Do you actually know what it means? Or have you heard improvisers use it a lot, but always feel like you don’t know if they know what they’re talking about?

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The Fuck-It Switch

Written by ASAF RONEN
It’s often been said: Improv is simple to understand, hard to master. However, that’s only because we tend to complicate things. The improv goes badly and we beat ourselves up about it. The improv goes well and we don’t believe it can be that easy so we add layers of difficulty the next time we step out there.

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The Inmates: First Class

Written by JO CHAUVIN
As we celebrate the Institution’s 4th Woodbury-location anniversary, I can’t help but remember when the Institution started altogether, in January 2008. As a proud member of the first class, and of The Inmates, the first house troupe- long before we had interns with the same name- I can say that we have had a long journey together:

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Surprise! You’re An Actor!

Written by TED MEREDITH
To be an improvisor is a wonderful thing. It requires being many things at once, writer, director, Buddhist monk. But the chief obligation on that stage is to perform, emote, and serve as a conduit for the audience to experience the world being created.

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Kirk, Spock, McCoy & Jar Jar

Written by KENNY MADISON
Doing improv with other people requires a commitment to communication. It requires understanding how the other person operates. It’s a two-way street.

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Why I Love A Long Form Named Harold

Written by CLIFTON HIGHFIELD
I love long form improvisation, and more specifically I love Harold. Some people might wonder why I would want to perform a format that was created over 30 years ago in some other city by a bearded guru. People might wonder why I wouldn’t prefer to create something new, something different, or something else.

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Your Improv Is Problematic

Written by KENNY MADISON
Have you ever been on stage, saw something that morally disagreed with you, and broke the scene by saying, “No!” I have. It was unpleasant on multiple levels.

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Asaf & The Chair

A Video by ASAF RONEN
Asaf Ronen, Education Director at The Institution Theater and a vetern improvisor of 25 years, would like to share a little something with you about chairs. Because a chair is not just a chair when it’s a chair on a stage.

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Get Committed Part II: The Improv Strikes Back

Written by TOM BOOKER
If you’re like me, you’ve learned a lot of life lessons from doing improv. The ideology of being committed may seem simplistic, but I can tell you that it can apply just as easily to your everyday life.

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Get Committed: Part I

Written by TOM BOOKER
Yoda said it best when he said “Try not! Do. Or do not. There is no try!” What Yoda is was talking about was commitment. Commitment is important. Commitment is necessary, especially in improv.

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